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of cairo. today's protest are not that high emotions remain raw in prepation of morsi. top judges are calling itun precedent they are calling morsi the modern day favor and fearing that he would be a dictator. i am uma live in washington. america's news head quarters starts right now. in response to the opposition in the streets was cairo. the muslim brotherhood is calling for a protest in cairo. they are joining with the latest on the developing story. steve. uma right now we are looking at what could be a show down between morsi and the country's judges here in cairo and others in the country. they say they will sphop work until the new president repeals his thursday decree that gave him the power to issue laws without oversight ask chance of them being over turned by the courts. the judges say he's trying to put himself above the law. it will be interesting to see whether all legal prosecutions come to a halt. numbers are fall down today. and numbers large yesterday about 40,000 at their peek and the protest turned violent. one police car set on fire. and protestors are hurling
happened about 70 miles outside of cairo. one of the regional offices. one person killed in the attack, 60 wounded. here in cairo security forces skirmishes continues you can hear sirens and ambulances as well as tear gas is popped off as several thousand protestors are demonstrating to show their unhappiness. >> gregg: will morsi plan on meeting the judges tomorrow and what will they be talking about? >> as you know the judges across the country have threatened to go out on strike over this power grab by the egyptian president. there has been a meeting scheduled for tomorrow between morrisi and the judges no word of a cancellation. it could be an attempt by the egyptian president to reach out to opponents trying to draw black from the violence that has escalated. what we are waiting for as far as the demonstrations, when pro and anti-people on the ground will try and march. we'll get a gauge of their numbers to see how strong they are. right now opposition figures say they will be no dialogue with the egyptian president until he revokes the decree. >> gregg: give us a sense of the number
the start of bargaining time. power and protest. furious demonstrators take to tahrir square in cairo, as egypt's new president rewrites the rules. >> the crowds are rowdy, rough, and down right rude, and the holiday shopping season has only just begun. >>> good morning, everyone. i'm radi kaye. it's 8:00. from maine to florida, millions of people are heading home as the thanksgiving holiday is wrapping up. today is usually one of the busiest travel days of the year, but so far it has been surprisingly quiet. cnn national correspondent suzanne candiotti is in new york hanging out with a few travellers this morning. suzanne, good morning to you. so i guess it's still pretty early in the day, but it should probably get pretty busy there later on. >> oh, it probably will pick up, but the best news of the day at this hour, anyway, is that there are virtually no backups to check in and no lines at security. there was a little flurry of activity earlier this morning, but now it's practically dead. this is the best time to fly on this busy, busy holiday weekend. of course, it is expected to
tear gassed protesters in cairo's tahrir square. angry demonstrators packed the square today denouncing egyptian president mohamed morsi as a dictator and accusing him of a power grab. cnn's reza sayah is in cairo. reza, what's it look like now? >> reporter: joe, it is 11:00 p.m. cairo time. these demonstrators started gathering around in tahrir square about 1:00 p.m. local time. that means they've been going strong for about ten hours. many thought maybe egyptians were worn out, tired of demonstrating after the 2011 revolution, but if you look at tahrir square today, if you look at cairo today, it doesn't seem like it. the demonstrations are continuing. so are clashes. about an hour and a half ago clashes taking place right where we are behind us at the hotel we're staying at. security forces clashing with protesters. a number of protesters ambushed a police vehicle carrying riot police. the police took off. the protesters got ahold of this truck, set it on fire. more security forces came in, shot tear gas and disbursed the protesters. we've seen similar clashes throughout the day. all
of the possibility of a cease-fire. hamas officials say, in fact, it would have been announced hours ago in cairo. clearly, that's not happening. there's no sign of a cease-fire. in fact, certainly, if you look -- if we go back over the last few hours, five or six hours, it's been an evening of fairly intense fire, not only incoming israeli air strikes, but just a little while ago, we saw two rockets being launched also from this area behind me. and certainly by the looks of those rockets, and we're getting very good at recognizing them, some of them do appear to be these so-called 5 rockets, which have a fairly long range, rockets fired in the direction of tel aviv and jerusalem. also today, one of those rockets falling to the south near the settlement block in the west bank. and another building, an israeli building a town outside tel aviv on the road to jerusalem. so we've seen a fairly intense evening, certainly, of violence here, incoming, as well as outgoing. and all this talk about a ceasefire and discussions in cairo and elsewhere don't seem to be amounting to much at this time. now, toda
square in cairo after the new egyptian president morsi gave himself sweeping new powers today. tahrir square also the heart of last year's uprising. demonstrators filled the streets of alexandria later today. morsi's new powers put his own decisions above all legal challenges until a new egyptian parliament is elected. despite the protests, morsi moving ahead with his plans at the same time insisting that his new powers are for the good ofu issued a statement moments ago saying in part, quote, we call for calm and encourage all parties to work together and call for all egyptians to resolve their differences over these important issues peacefully and through democratic dialogue. jim maceda will join us coming up in 20 minutes right here. >>> turning from egypt now to the border between israel and gaza where a two-day cease fire is already being tested. israeli troops shot and killed a 20-year-old man on the gaza side of the line today. the first death since the truce. nbc news reporting that the man was trying to get to his family farm. we have coverage from both sides of the border to
the egyptian assembly agreed on a final constitution. a vote is expected today. holly williams is in cairo. >> reporter: what we're seeing here in egypt is a straight on -- 0 show down between mohamed morsi the country's first democratically elected president and his opponent. morsi is showing no signs of backing down from the expanded new powers that he gave himself last week including immunity from the court. judges from these top courts have gone on strike. meanwhile egypt's supreme constitutional court said it will rule on sunday on whether or not to dissolve the assembly that drafted egypt's new constitution. that assembly is dominated by morsi's allies. they are rushing to finish a final draft. on tahrir square in central cairo some opponents are camped out and say they won't leave until he relinquishes his new powers. president morsi supporters are planning a demonstration there on saturday. that could spark violent clashes. holly williams, cbs news, cairo. >> today the united nations is expected to vote to recognize palestine as a sovereign state. the vote to give the palestinians
prime minister benjamin netanyahu before jetting to cairo for talks with the president of egypt, mohammad morsi. the urgency underscored by the carnage in benghazi. rockets are lobbying back and forth. israeli air attacks killing 27 more palestinians bringing the death toll to 137 just in the last week. >> now a spokesman for hamas sounded cautiously optimistic that a cease-fire could be at hand telling cnn we are close, we are on the edge. cnn has reporters blanketing the region to bring you the most comprehensive coverage of this crisis in gaza. fred pleitgen is in ashkelon, ben wedemans in gaza city. ben wedeman, good morning, set the scene for me. >> reporter: yes, brooke, it was a noisezy night and we saw intense bombardment just behind where i'm standing. that was proceeded by increasing sort of mounting reports that a cease-fire was about to be announced or a period of calm. but it appears that there were problems within the israeli government that prime minister benjamin netanyahu and his foreign minister lieberman didn't see eye to eye with the defense minister who was
-fire, these talks taking place in cairo have told nbc news they are serious, that they are making progress and that this is how the negotiations stand right at this moment. the israelis want a two-part deal, a two-stage deal. the first part would be an immediate hostility, immediate cessation of violence, both sides stop attacking each other. that would be unconditional. then israel would want to move to a second stage where the two sides, israel and the palestinians, would engage in this discussions, negotiations overs the next two weeks to one month talking about potentially ending the siege on gaza, making it easier for palestinians -- >> and clearly we're having difficulty with richard's reporting. surmounts any difficult of technology. richard is reporting on negotiations in cairo -- amman, you're in gaza as well. negotiations would be a immediate cessation of hostilities and a two-stage process within two weeks to a month there would be a broader agreement. we've known from the start that israel wants to do something about changing the reality where these rocket attacks do not contin
in cairo. meameanwhile, as you mentioned,t far from where i'm standing, troops and attention are ready for a possible ground incursion. we heard from the exiled leader of hamas. he held a news conference in cairo this afternoon. he said he's not calling for any type of escalation but he said, and i quote him, we will not accept any israeli demands. they were the ones who attacked. the cease-fire will occur when our demands are met. what are those demands? they're reportedly calling for an end to the blockade of gaza and no mortar getted assassinations by israel. israel, meanwhile, wants a buffer zone set up along the border with gaza and they want the rocket fire to cease before the current escalation began earlier this year, there were hundreds and hundreds of rockets fired by militants from gaza into israel. just hours ago, shaun, air read sirens went off in israel. militants fired at least three voyles of rockets. overhead we can see the iron dome missile defense system doing its job. there were no injuries. the israeli military is keeping up pressure on the militants in gaza. just
both israel and hamas are in cairo to meet separately with representatives from egypt to advance the cease-fire talks. and, as we mentioned this is all happening as israel's defense minister ehud barak announced he is resigning his post. that's just happening. meanwhile egypt internally embroiled by president mohamed morsi's move late last week granting really extraordinary powers. critics have called it an undemocratic power grab. today morsi meets with egypt's highest judicial body which has denounced his action. we're going to go now to matthew chance who is in london. good morning, matthew. i want to start with the news that really just happened. israel's defense minister ehud barak finishing up a press conference, announcing that he is resigning come january. any sense of whythis move is happening, and what next for ehud barak? he's really been a central key figure in israel for decades. >> yes, he certainly has. i don't think there's a great deal of surprise in this announcement. certainly within israel and the political circles that i've been speaking to, at least. it's so
with any envoys. he will be heading back to cairo tomorrow to meet with hillary clinton. egyptian officials involved or familiar with them have been telling nbc news this is unlikely to be a long-term truce. this is more likely to be a cessation of hostilities in the short term to pave the way for longer discussions about the fundamental issues as to why this persistent problem keeps coming up, the siege on gaza, rockets into southern israel and outstanding issues. what we can say so far is that all indications suggest that there will be a truce at some point. palestinian factions here say they are open to it. they say nothing has been signed. they don't mind having a short-term truce. so long as egypt will guarantee the fundamental issues of the bigger problems of gaza are addressed and not kicked down the road. i think that's something that martin suggested. there are a lot of fund mental issues that need to be resolved. no indication all of those have been addressed in the short-term cessation of hostilities which egyptian officials say is within their reach, although nothing yet officia
to cairo where she's meeting with the egyptian president mursi. mrs. clinton making it clear that she is not interested in a quick fix in gaza. >> the goal must be a durable outcome that promotes regional stability, and advances the security and legitimate aspirations of israelis and palestinians alike. >> cnn reporters flanking the middle east today to bring you the most comprehensive coverage of the crisis in gaza and in jerusalem and in israel. ben wedeman is in gaza city. frederick pleitgen is in ashkelon city. we begin with sara sidner at the scene of that bus explosion that happened just a little while ago in tel aviv. sara first of all describe for me how that looks right now. >> what has happened right now is the cleanup is under way. there are still tape up around the scene. we're very close to the defense department building, and the military headquarters, this is a bus that the number 61 bus, we know that it exploded, glass all around the bus was blown out. however the blast was not strong enough to knock out the ability for the bus to operate. and so we saw literally the b
. later today she will be in cairo to meet with world leaders. palestinian gunmen shot and killed six men they say were collaborating israel and dragged one body behind a motorcycle. susan mcginnis is watching all of this. >> reporter: good morning. once again there were signs of a deal and, again, they slipped away. now in cairo, secretary clinton will meet with officials who are in contact with hamas and now talking about a deal she says in the days ahead. as truce talks continue so does the violence. this is what cbs reporter charlie d'agata saw from his gaza city hotel early this morning. the israeli military launched dozens of air strikes overnight and this morning. and hamas militants have launched more than 100 rockets into israel in the past 24 hours. five israelis and more than 100 palestinians have died in the past eight days. >> we are in a battle to save lives. >> reporter: really prime minister benjamin netanyahu met with secretary of state hillary clinton on tuesday night saying israel is hoping for peaceful to end the fighting. >> this is a possibility of achieving a long t
on the young democracy. cnn's reza sayah is in cairo this morning. good morning. >> reporter: good morning, carol. new developments today in tie cairo that could further entangle and muddy what is an already complicated conflict. we have confirmed that next week on december 4th a court in cairo will hear several cases brought against the controversial decrees declared by mr. morsi last week. here's where the intrigue comes in. last week one of his decrees banned anyone, any authority, even the judiciary from questioning and overturning any of his decisions since he took office. we'll see how that plays out. meantime protests continue. there doesn't seem to be a resolution to this conflict. the leaders of the opposition factions have dug in saying we're not going to have dialogue until mr. morsi rescinds his decrees. a few hours ago we spoke to one of his top advisers and we asked him, is that a possibility? >> what kind of concessions are you willing to make. >> this decision is up to the president, not for us. >> is it possible -- is it possible he will rescind his decrees. >> dialogue wi
it was a spontaneous reaction to what had just transpired in cairo. as a consequence of the video. >> reporter: and she never described it as a terror attack back then and that has outrained key republicans who find her comments very troubling. >> i don't think this is a matter of dishonesty. it was a matter again of responsibility. there was plenty of information out there which she has access to, which contradicted what she said. well you have, if you're telling the american people speaking for the white house, it was the white house that sent her out, you have the responsibility to make sure those facts are accurate. >> reporter: so they're looking at responsibility component of this, not so much dishonesty, there were allegations perhaps she was trying to help the white house cover up something. now it is going to the core what she knew and was she fundamentally wrong and came out and said spontaneous reaction as opposed to describing as a terror attack. ambassador rice will be meeting a few minutes from now to answer the questions from senator mccain and others who have problem with her statements
. >> i'm zoraida sambolin. >> in egypt the u.s. embassy in cairo is closed. no one is being allowed in or out of the embassy now. embassy officials say the entrance is blocked by protesters as clashes erupt nearby. massive demonstrations against president morsy threatened the new young government after a degree last week extending his powers to an e uneasy level for some egyptians. americans in cairo going to the embassy for business, please don't. no one is going in or out of the embassy in cairo. >> and finding a way to steer clear of the fiscal cliff. the chief fiscal cliff negotiator tim geithner working with leaders to get things moving. there are just 33 days left to get a deal done. congress breaks for the holidays in just 15 days. dan lothian joins us. so the clock is ticking away. >> after the meeting the president had after he went to southeast asia the lawmakers were optimistic. now you are hearing some pessimistic as the clock winds down. you see the president pushing the bush era tax cut extension for middle class america. the white house doesn't believe this is the com
continued at this hour in cairo in meetings reportedly taking place involving the prime minister of egypt, the prime minister of turkey as well as the emir trying to come up with a cease-fire there are indications the talks are continuing but here on the ground they plan to implement some kind of ground incursion into gaza if necessary. the military has been offered to draft as many as 57,000 reservists. you can see roads are closed off and see and hear an increased amount of military activity. if there is not a diplomatic solution soon it looks like the violence is going to be ratcheted up. >> heather: david lee miller. thank you. >> gregg: let's take a look. so far 57 rockets have landed inside israel. that doesn't include the 25 rockets that have been intercepted by israel's iron dome. since the started the pillar of defense over 400 rockets and miles have hit hundreds more have been intercepted. how exactly does the iron dome missile defense work? they calculate each rocket's trajectory and only intercepted those that will hate target. this is iron dome to a vast array of sensors to d
-moon is heading to cairo for emergency negotiations. good morning, welcome to the program packed full of fantastic guests to give you you updates and analysis on where we are in trade. if europe, higher by 0.8%. coming off the 3 1/2 month low that we saw in the close on friday, helped along by optimism on the negotiations to avoid a fiscal cliff state side. we saw quite a rally in the u.s. on friday's close and that is feeding through to europe here this morning. ftse 100 higher by 09%, xetra dax by more than 1% and ibex 35 more than half a percentage point. the bond markets, the question is whether or not we'll see a lid on on bond prices on treasuries especially if we manage to overt a fiscal cliff scenario, if we see productive talks continuing. right now we're seeing the yield on on the ten year bund just a little bit higher. we're seeing a bit of buying taking place in the spanish and italian debt market on the ten year and a little bit of selling on on the gilt. the currency markets just to give you a full update on where we are, we have a relatively flat on slightly higher euro-dollar. so w
and negotiate an end to the current round of fighting. this morning there are conflicting reports out of cairo that israel and gaza could be close to a truce. clarissa ward is in the egyptian capital. good morning, clarissa. >> reporter: good morning, charlie and norah. the egyptian president morsi has said repeatedly he hopes to announce a cease-fire agreement imminently. but cbs news has spoken to a source very close to the hamas delegation here in cairo. they said that so far these talks are not going anywhere. now, one of the reasons for that may be that hamas is making some pretty big demands in exchange for stopping its rocket attacks on israel. primarily it wants an end to the israeli blockade of the gaza strip. israel unlikely to budge on that issue because of fears that lifting the blockade would lead to an influx of weapons that could get into the hands of militants inside gaza. as you said, u.n. secretary general ban ki-moon is on his way to cairo now for talks as diplomatic efforts here really intensify to try to stop this conflict from escalating to a point of no return. >> claris
alert. more trouble in the middle east. this is in cairo, egypt. you can see the teargas wafting through the streets as protestors take to tahrir square and other places to protest against that country's new president, mohammed morsi. he has just assigned himself sweeping new powers. this comes after he helped broker that peace between -- that cease-fire between hamas and israel. perhaps thinking that he is suddenly a leader on the world stage he decided to announce that all of the decisions he has made since assuming office in january cannot be challenged by the egyptian courts. as you can see a number of especially young people in egypt none too pleased about this. they have been protesting in cairo and alexandria and other places. morsi of course an islamist, a member of the muslim brotherhood, the ideological ally of hamas. it is yet to be seen what the response will be from the obama administration to these new powers that he has awarded himself. he has also ordered a new trial for his predecessor hosni mubarak. we will continue to watch the troubles developing inee lit up and the p
>> good morning, everyone, it's sunday, november 25th, i'm alisyn camerota. in cairo muslim brotherhood encourages protests. anti-morsi protesters taking over tahrir square. >> dave: and shredder, and police files used as confetti at the macy's day parade. how can it happen? is our security now at risk? >> illinois has the worst budget deficit in the nation and why is the state spending millions of taxpayer dollars on table for prisoners. >> and eco friendly zip lines, maybe they want them to watch "fox & friends" in prison, have you ever thought of that. >> dave: amen, there's some viewers, baby. >> clayton: "fox & friends" begins right now. ♪ . >> alisyn:. >> alisyn: good morning, everybody, thanks for joining us bright and early on this sunday morning, we have quite a show for you, including the ongoing debate that dave briggs launched yesterday about yoga pants and we invite you to weigh in this morning. >> clayton: you're still leading this fight and championing this fight. >> alisyn: he's made it a platform. >> dave: i may run for the white house based on yoga pants.
east. will that happen? we're going back live to gaza. we're going to cairo, we're going to israel. all of that right here in "the situation room." nd? ♪ announcing the all-new 2013 malibu from chevrolet. ♪ with a remarkable new interior featuring the available chevrolet mylink infotainment system. this is where sophisticated styling begins. and where it ends? that's up to you. it's here -- the greatest malibu ever. ♪ is what drives us to broadcast the world's biggest events in 3d, or live to your seat high above the atlantic ocean. it's what drives us to create eco-friendly race tracks, batteries that power tomo's cars, and the sustainable smart towns of the future. at panasonic, we're driven to make what matters most better. just another way we're engineering a better world for you. yeah, i might have ears like a rabbit... but i want to eat meat! [ male announcer ] iams knows dogs love meat. ...but most dry foods add plant protein, like gluten iams never adds gluten. iams adds 50% more animal protein, [ dog 2 ] look at me! i'm a lean, mean flying machine [ dog 1 ] i am too! woo
streaming live from cairo with the latest. steve, do you think that we could see some kind of compromise today on this? >> reporter: martha, we are certainly hearing sound from the presidential teamsh to reace opposition in a push for a possible compromise. what we're likely to see in the next 90 minutes here is a meeting between egypt's president and some top judges here inside cairo. judges across the country have gone on strike. they say the president tried to put himself above the law. we could see some scaling back from a presidential team that has been surprised by the angry reaction to the move by president morsi, martha. martha: such a key moment for the future of egypt. what happens if they fail to reach any kind of compromise here? >> reporter: well for the past four days we've already seen violence in the streets not only here in cairo but other egyptian cities as well. more than 500 people wounded, one person killed. if there is no compromise today, we could see million man marches on both sides of the issue tomorrow in cairo. when you have a million people on one side, a mil
, police firing tear gas. fight for democracy intensifying there. cairo's tie rear square. grounds for protester. you hear the chanting. demonstrators are not leaving the square until president morsi withdraws the sweeping powers he granted himself last week. ressa sayah joining us live from cairo. it was billed as the opposition's biggest show of force yet. demonstrators converging, various points throughout the city. what do they hope to accomplish? what is the message? >> reporter: the message is they want to either oust president morsi or have him reverse his controversial decrees announced last thursday. this is an incredible site here behind us the tahrir squire, billed as 1 million man demonstration. not sure if there are 1 million people here, but certainly at lot of people. i'll zoom into tahrir square. the crowd is loud, energized, excited. tens of thousands of people here representing different factions in egypt. representing women's rights groups, western-style liberals, secularists, moderates. all have banded together in a show of force, in a show of opposition, agains
of regional stability and peace. >> we start with nbc's jim macedo in cairo. who what are the details? >> reporter: well, steve, most importantly, starting at 2:00 p.m. as you mentioned israel stops all military action in israel and hamas stops launching rockets on israel and carrying out border attacks on israeli troops but this is the key thing. there is no signed formal agreement here. instead, israel and hamas reached an understanding, a kind of exchange of quiet for quiet. the first phase of a broader agreement. that should be followed by more intense negotiations, those will be anchored and guaranteed we understand by egypt and the united states. to try to resolve the key demands on both sides. of course, for hamas, the lifting of that 6-year-old blockade of gaza. for israel, it's stopping all the weapons smuggling. but neither will happen immediately. at least, however, they have agreed in principle to these demands and the need to work them out. you had a clip of secretary clinton. she went on to call the cease-fire deal a step in the right direction. she said she looks forwar
on this situation with ian lee in cairo tonight. what's the situation right now? >> reporter: well, tom, it's 2:00 a.m. now in cairo. and the protests are still going on. we're still seeing clashes in and around tahrir square between the protesters and the police. we're seeing a range of things thrown back and forth. rocks, we've seen molotov cocktails, we've seen tear gas. there are reports of police shooting into the air to scare off protesters. this is a very intense scene we've seen. we haven't seen anything like this really since a year ago when we saw clashes, when we saw dozens of people killed. this has really been the most intense set of clashes since then and all these protesters are angry about that power grab you were describing where president morsi really has no one overseeing him. the judiciary, he has pushed that aside. he now has really full power and tomorrow, we're going to be watching closely, also, the judiciaries said they might strike basically grinding the whole country's court system to a halt in retaliation for this power grab and also need to point out there are have been
the videotape. that was going in cairo. do you worry there's been a coverup? >> i am very concerned about the fact that on september 11th this happened, and on september 20th there was -- the top level people were still telling us the same thing. they were telling us things that they knew that we even some in the press were not correct information. now, benghazi was a consulate. it wasn't a full embassy. i think if we have learned one thing, it is that maybe we should close consulates and give the full protection to our ambassadors who were willing to risk this kind of upheaval, so i do think we need to go into this in depth. i think this f there were military people trying to get in and they were being told no, no, no repeatedly we need to fix that. >> when we return. >> in my opinionth last two years, 2011-2012, have been the least productive and most partisan and uncompromising in my 24 years here. can i help you? i heard you guys can ship ground for less than the ups store. that's right. i've learned the only way to get a holiday deal is to camp out. you know we've been open all night
in the west bank, meaning with the palestinian authority, then in cairo could nudge along the process to see if they could get to a point of some sort of negotiated cease-fire. as far as the united states is concerned, what spokesperson said, that begins with hamas stopping the rocket fire into israel and then a longer negotiated settlement, they hope, can be agreed upon. >> chuck todd live in cambodia. thanks so much. as chuck was just talking about, secretary of state hillary clinton is going to be heading directly from cambodia to israel to try to help work out a diplomatic solution to the violent escalation of tensions in gaza. nbc's chapman bell is live with us for the situation there. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. as calls for a cease-fire grow, the violence does continue. overnight the israeli defense force attacked 100 targets inside the gaza strip they say are necessary to stop this flow of rockets, underground rocket launchers and weapons depots as well as financial institutions to hamas. now, this morning, though, militants within the gaza strip responded with volleys o
forward. secretary of state hillary clinton is in cairo. we talked of a cease-fire yesterday at this time and so far there has been no agreement. today's events have pushed off an agreement even further. gregg: leland vittert we'll check back with you. can secretary clinton get both sides to agree on anything or are we in for more violence? jack keane will join us live. >> the labor department just releasing its weekly unemployment claims report. applications falling a little from the week before but still high at 410,000. the labor department blaming the recent spike in claims on superstorm sandy. last week's numbers were the first time we saw above 400,000 in more than a year. we are learning that has been resides up by 12,000. it was originally reported at 439,000 and was 451,000. that's an 8-month high for reporting. gregg: new applications for unemployment benefits fluctuated between 380,000 and 390,000. jobless claims have stayed above 300,000 and spiked in early 2009. they must fall below 375,000 to indicate the job market is strong enough to lower the unemployment rate. >> unions
cairo with steve hariggan, standing by live. >> reporter: the numbers are building of protesters here in tahrir square, the number of tents growing as the protesters say they are here to stay and digging in. on the street below me, over the past few minutes, we have seen young protesters, lighting bottles on fire and running. the skirmishes have wounded more than 3 people. we have seen the military begin to move large concrete block, blocking off certain narrow alleyways and protecting government buildings. explosions can be heard behind me. right now, one key thing to watch is where the protests go next. we are expecting major demonstrations on both sides on tth. those who support president morsi and think he is doing what needs to be done. and those who think he is making a power grab, trying to become a dictator. both groups will try to get out their constituents on tuesday. it will be a real test of power. the final thing to watch, the country's judges, many are saying they are going on strike. it could shut down the judicial system across the country this week. >> shannon: steve,
. >> unbelievable. more than 100,000 people flooded into downtown cairo. this time they are protesting the current president martha maccallum and his power grab. they are disillusioned with what he has brought to their country. then you have this happening. police firing teargas. gypt's highest courts refusing to work in protest of morsi's actions. steve harrigan is streaming live from cairo. the protests looked like the unrest we saw in that same square back in 2009 and the arab spring and the overthrow of mubarak. how dangerous is it? is it more dangerous now? >> this certainly allows similarities between what we saw last night and those demonstrations that overthrew mubarak. hundreds of thousands of people are energized. many of them want this president out. but a couple of important differences. the current president martha maccallum was elected by 52% of the vote just five months ap a - the current president mohamed morsi haas elected by 52% of the vote. martha: it was a close election and the other choice may have been a more democratic choice. people were searching for new leadership and th
of the u.s. embassy in cairo is now closed. this after violent clashes cutting off access to the u.s. embassy in cairo. there are thousands back in the street and they are angry, demanding president mohammed morsi, the new president step down. steve harrigan streams live in cairo, it is nightfall now. what do we know about the u.s. embassy, steve? >> the u.s. embassy building is really just down the block from where i'm standing here and egypt security forces have put up a 12-foot high call of cinder block to keep that alleyway safe where the embassy is. the public services section which visitors use is closed today. that part of it is closed off. the embassy itself has not been targeted but it is part of a rough taeub rough neighborhood around tahrir square where protestors are throwing rocks and police are firing teargas. two buildings were set on fire, those blazes are now out. warnings issued to all americans to avoid the downtown area over the next few days due to the unrest, bill. bill: when will the new egyptian president morsi speak, do we know that, steve? >> reporter: we
harrigan is streaming live from cairo with the latest. where do the protests go from here? >> rick, the numbers are down today from what we saw on friday and we're likely to see more large scale protest demonstrations in the coming days, after sunday morning prayers and again on tuesday. what we're likely to see then are really competing margins, those who support the president, who feel like his moves are necessary, to break the log jam and to move the country forward and those who think that the president is trying to achieve a dictatorship. those who are trying to block him. so we're going to see more large scale protests and the other things to watch resignation is, three presidential aides have recently resigned in the past two hours and the judges are refusing, so if it continues to grow, this could put much more pressure on the egyptian president and we're looking at tahrir square and reminded when the crowds were protesti protesting hosni mubarak, who are they and how united are they? >> certainly a lot of similarities both with the scenes and even some of the chants shall
for himself a new dictatorship. reza sayah is in cairo right now. do these protesters have a point? is this the same style of leadership that triggered the arab spring? >> if you ask the protesters if they have a point, they'll give you an emphatic yes. these are demonstrators who believe the revolution, the principles of the 2011 revolution is in jeopardy, and they believe its current president mohammed morsi who has put those principles in jeopardy. all this outrage and fury as the outcome of a set of decrees suddenly announced on thursday night. these give them sweeping powers and it seems to be an effort to push through the drafting of egypt's all new constitution. one of the decrees says that no one, not even the judiciary can overturn and appeal any of mr. morsi's declarations, decisions since he took office in june. this order seems to be put in place until a parliament is in place. several months from now. technically this is a man who can do whatever he wants for the next few months without any oversight. that's one of the decrees, fredricka, that people here are outraged
in cairo. the u.s. embassy there is closed. no one is being allowed in or out as we speak. >> embassy officials say protesters are blocking the entrance and clashes are happening near nearby. reza sayah is nearby for us. what's happening? >> reporter: there is no indication protesters are targeting the u.s. em wibassy b it was closed as a precaution. these are protesters who clashed with police. these are the trouble-making elements, the teenagers, young men, the 20-somethings who for the past four days vo thrown red sox, debris, molotov cocktails at police. police responded by firing teargas, stun grenades. some police officers have been throwing rocks as well. some of the clashes have been inching toward the assembly which is a couple of blocks from tahrir square. four hours ago the embassy shut its doors saying no one would come in or leave until further notice. more demonstrations scheduled in the days ahead in tahrir square. the embassy announcing that services for american citizens in cairo will be cancelled until further notice. >> this is all over president morsy's power grab.
of that video in cairo and elsewhere. >> usually they do put the u.s. ambassador to the u.n. out before the big general assembly meetings which were about to begin. >> reporter: great point. >> that's probably one of the reasons they selected her as well. that's at least what i've been told by insiders. dana, thanks very much. >>> we're now only 35 days away from the so-called fiscal cliff. deep cuts in federal spending coupled with sharp tax increases by law they take effect automatically and many experts fear will throw the u.s. economy back into a recession. both congress and the white house are trying to make a deficit reduction deal to avoid the financial chaos. and president obama's reverting to some campaign mode right now to try to make sure things are done his way. our white house correspondent dan lothian is joining us now with new information. what are you learning, dan? >> reporter: well, wolf, while senior members of the administration including secretary geithner, chief of staff jack lou also top advisor meeting with -- the president himself trying to sell his vision to the public
, secretary of state clinton will fly to cairo, egypt to meet with prime minister morsi that has been holding peace talkings. >> brian: yesterday we are talking about peace talk and hear a cease fire kicking in and we know it department happen and the bombing didn't stop. and this, this morning lerand viter is in tel aviv where a bomb went off in the city. leland. >> i am setting the scene for you on my israeli answer to the pentagon. a city threw a bomb on to the bus or left one it is not a suicide bomber, but 10 people were injured. three of them very seriously wounded here in this attack. the two suspects on the list would be hamas or islamic jihad, both operating out of the gaza strip. hamas is peace talks and trying to figure out if a cease fire over israel with the rockets and the bombings on the other side going into the gaza strip . islamic jihad has a different agend a. they are backers in iran who are pushing for rocket fire against the gaz strip. we should have a shot up of this on our live view, you can actually see this bus that stopped. this harkens back to the days of the secon
this thing will last. gregg: did secretary clinton's shuttle diplomacy from jerusalem to cairo prove pen official here? >> -- beneficial here in. >> yes, certainly. the administration deserves credit, to be sure, but it's not a major victory in the sense that we have a middle east peace which has been as elusive to this administration as it has been to the previous ones. but at the end of her reign as secretary of state, her tenure is coming to conclusion with mounting criticism over benghazi and the lack of security, this certainly is a plus. gregg: are you surprised at how helpful the new islamist government of muhammad morsi really was in this process as a mediator standing up for the truce, probably pressuring hamas and, of course, their benefactor? are you surprised at what they did? yeah. i think it's a pleasant surprise. i mean, this is not the government we would have wanted in egypt post-mubarak because they are muslim brotherhood, and there's parts of the muslim brotherhood that is totally alien to us, the salafist movement which are radical islamists, but here he is openly spo
january. that development comes as delegations for both israel and hamas meet in cairo today. they're meeting with egyptian officials to try to advance those cease-fire talks. and egypt's president mohamed morsi will meet today with judges to explain his edict barring them from overturning any decision that he makes or any laws that he imposes until a new parliament is formed. reza sayah is in cairo this morning. let's start with mohamed morsi, please. >> yeah, good morning, soledad. a few thousand protesters still here in south tahrir squares, especially those who camped out over the past several days, still seeing some clashes. most of them triggered by what seem to be teenagers and twenty somethings out here looking for trouble. we also saw our first fatality of the protest last night on sunday in a northern city where a 15-year-old member of the muslim brotherhood youth movement was clubbed to death. at this point the brotherhood doesn't seem to be using that fatality as a rallying cry to shore up support. but at the same time, it doesn't seem to be any indication that this con
plan to stage a massive demonstration tomorrow. holly williams is in cairo and has been watching this whole crisis unfold. >> reporter: a week after president mohamed morsi gave himself broad new powers that some egyptians say make him a dictator in all but name his islamist allies have rushed to finish a final draft of the country's constitution. it could now be put to a referendum before the end of the year. protests and violent clashes in cities across egypt, president morsi defended his power grab last night on egyptian state tv. he said his new authority is needed to guide egypt through its democratic transition and that he will give up his expanded powers once the country has a new constitution. a final draft of the constitution is now complete, written and voted on by a panel dominated by president's morsi's political allies, neither all of them islamists. the constitution gives islamic sharia law a more specific role in government and doesn't guarantee women's equality. it also empowers the state to defend morals and values. critics like human rights lawyer say that could
-- that anti-islamic video that sparked the riots in cairo. that's the confusion, that film or a terrorist attack? they got 20 intelligence reports blaming the film riot in cairo. but, this is critical, those reports were disproved over time. but disproved after petraeus made his initial presentation to congress. so david petraeus believes there's a lot of confusion and a lot of misrepresentation of what he originally told congress when he briefed them initially after the attacks. he wants to go up there tomorrow, sort it all out. he will also say he had his own talking points separate from u.n. ambassador susan rice. that came from somewhere other in the administration than his direct talking point. so he wants to get all this sorted out. he believes it was the al qaeda sympathizer group ansar al sharia that was responsible for the attacks. >> so the question, barbara, is he is convinced that the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi had nothing, nothing to do with that anti-muslim video that'd been posted on youtube, that this was a terrorist attack by this al qaeda affiliated organiz
prince of qatar and cairo. even the tunisian prime minister that's visited gaza, and this is a muslim brotherhood president who has very close ties to hamas and, therefore, he is a valid interlocuture. >> i don't think they want to see a ground war or an extension of this conflict because it will destabilize an already destabilized region, especially considering what's happening in syria. >> ambassador let's talk about israeli politics as former ambassador to israel, you know the political system there well. we just finished our election. there's an election coming up in january. how much of this could possibly be the prime minister showing the strength of his administration as he stands there at the boarder? >> i think there's an element of that. i think the first thing is the fact that the rockets, especially the rockets that have a range of about 45 to 46 miles and that can come close to even tel aviv, that that is the immediate catalyst for this operation, but there's no doubt that prime minister netanyahu see some political utility in showing a hard line to protect israel's natio
in cairo involved in peace talks and they are trying to bring about a cease-fire. chris, back to you in washington. >> he is reporting live from the israel-gaza border. thanks for that. >>> joining me now, two leading senators on national security issues. the advice chair of the intelligence committee and joe leiberman, head of the homeland security committee. before we get to the benghazi investigation, i want to ask you both about the growing conflict between the israel's and gaza. do you worry about a ground war in gaza, especially in this changing post arab spring middle east? >> ultimately obviously in the first instance to hamas, i don't think the israelis really want a ground war. they are only going to go into gaza if they feel they need to to eliminate the remainder of the missiles, a lot of them supplied by iran of that been coming over to israel. hundreds of them this year. so really the decision is up to hamas as to whether there will be a ground invasion of gaza or not. remember what hamas is. it's not the palestinian authority, which is recognized the right of israel to
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